Friday, December 23, 2011

Referring to metis-PRAXIS Research Associates, 1999: Historic Métis in Ontario - Wawa,(page 2 4)




R E S E A R C H    R E P O R T:
HISTORIC  MÉTIS IN  ONTARIO:
WAWA and ENVIRONS
FOR
THE MINISTRY OF NATURAL RESOURCES
OF THE GOVERNMENT OF ONTARIO
NAT IVE AFFAIRS UNIT
300 Water Street
P.O. Box 7000
Peterborough, Ontario K9J 8M5
August 12, 1999

Excerpt from Page 24

"Peterson (1985:39) asserts that the distinctiveness of métis in Great Lakes area was fully
apparent to outsiders by the early decades of the 1800s when racial terms began to be used in
classifying Indians from half-breeds or métis. Van Kirk (1980:95-6) reports that ca. 1800, a NWC
policy of supporting servants’ families coupled with the emergence of a body of “freemen”, resulted
in the progeny of Nor’Westers being recognized at an early stage as a group distinct from the Indians.
They were known as “métis” or “bois brulés” and by far the largest number of them were
descendants of the French-Canadian engagés and their Indian wives. According to Gorham (ibid.:40-
41), it was not until the 1820s that a few scattered references to half-breeds began to appear in the
writings of Catholic missionaries – one of whom writes of marriages of “Canadians or halfbreeds
to full blooded Indian women.” While indicating the existence of a separate ethnic category for
mixed bloods, this quote also raises the issue of the ambiguous use of the word “Canadian” to refer
to métis, a methodological problem raised also by Giraud (1986). Giraud emphasizes that the context
in which the word is used in historical documents from this time period is key to determining to
whom the name ‘Canadian’ or canadien is referring. In many cases the name is applied to employees
of the North West Company. Giraud’s “Canadian Métis” refers to NWC mixed-blood individuals
and families, in contrast to those attached to the Hudsons Bay Company whom he labels “Scottish
half-breeds (ibid.:346-347)"
Full report-http://www.metisnation.org/media/141020/ontario%20report%20-%20michipicoten.pdf

Tuesday, September 6, 2011

The assemblage of Indian warriors and headmen that met with Anthony Wayne on the sixteenth of June, and[Pg 241]continued in session until the tenth day of August, 1795, was the most noted ever held in America


CHAPTER XV

The Project Gutenberg EBook of The Land of the Miamis, by Elmore Barce

This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with
almost no restrictions whatsoever.  You may copy it, give it away or
re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included
with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.org
Title: The Land of the Miamis
An Account of the Struggle to Secure Possession of the
North-West from the End of the Revolution until 1812
Author: Elmore Barce
Release Date: October 13, 2009 [EBook #30244]
Language: English
Character set encoding: ISO-8859-1
START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK THE LAND OF THE MIAMIS ***Produced by David Garcia, Barbara Kosker and the Online
Distributed Proofreading Team at http://www.pgdp.net (This
file was produced from images generously made available
by The Kentuckiana Digital Library)

THE TREATY OF GREENVILLE

The surrender of the Ohio lands of the Miamis and their final submission to the Government.
Excerpt PG 240 AND 241
The first to come to Greenville to consult with Wayne, were the Wyandots of Sandusky. "He told them he pitied them for their folly in listening to the British, who were very glad to urge them to fight and to give them ammunition, but who had neither the power nor the inclination to help them when the time of trial came; that hitherto the Indians had felt only the weight of his little finger, but that he would surely destroy all the tribes in the near future if they did not make peace." During the winter of 1794-1795 parties of Wyandots, Ottawas, Chippewas, Potawatomi, Sacs, Miamis, Delawares and Shawnees came in, and on February 11th, 1795, the preliminaries of a treaty were agreed upon between the Shawnees, Delawares and Miamis, and the Americans. Arrangements were also made for a grand council with all the Indian nations at Fort Greenville, on or about the fifteenth of the ensuing June.
From an old painting by one of Wayne's staff. By Courtesy The Chicago Historical Society
General Anthony Wayne and Little Turtle at Greenville.ToList
The assemblage of Indian warriors and headmen that met with Anthony Wayne on the sixteenth of June, and[Pg 241]continued in session until the tenth day of August, 1795, was the most noted ever held in America. Present, were one hundred and eighty Wyandots, three hundred and eighty-one Delawares, one hundred and forty-three Shawnees, forty-five Ottawas, forty-six Chippewas, two hundred and forty Potawatomi, seventy-three Miamis and Eel Rivers, twelve Weas and Piankeshaws, and ten Kickapoos and Kaskaskias, in all eleven hundred and thirty savages. Among the renowned fighting men and chiefs present, was Tarhe, of the Wyandots, known as "The Crane," who had fought under the Cornstalk at Point Pleasant, and who had been badly wounded at the battle of Fallen Timbers. He now exercised a mighty influence for peace and remained the firm friend of the United States. Of the Miamis, the foremost was the Little Turtle, who was probably the greatest warrior and Indian diplomat of his day or time. He had defeated Harmar and destroyed St. Clair, but he now stood for an amicable adjustment. Next to Little Turtle was LeGris. Of the Shawnees, there were Blue Jacket and Catahecassa, or the Black Hoof. The latter chieftain had been present at Braddock's defeat in 1775, had fought against General Andrew Lewis at Point Pleasant in 1774, and was an active leader of the Shawnees at the battles with Harmar and St. Clair. Blue Jacket had been the principal commander of the Indian forces at Fallen Timbers. Buckongahelas, of the Delawares, Au-goosh-away, of the Ottawas, Mash-i-pinash-i-wish, of the Chippewas, Keesass and Topenebee, of the Potawatomi, Little Beaver, of the Weas, and many other distinguished Indian leaders were among the hosts. The chief interpreters were William Wells, [Pg 242]Jacques Laselle, M. Morins, Sans Crainte, Christopher Miller, Abraham Williams and Isaac Zane.

Saturday, February 26, 2011

Free Falcon Ride by Kevin Lajiness


as high as the mountains “again and again 
I want to be a free again and again the waves of the wind 
Like and Indian again and again I could free Like and Indian 
riding the waves of the wind I could free myself I could free myself” 
When I was young tall and strong I was a free bird 
When I was young tall and strong I was a free bird 
Like a Indian riding the waves of the wind 
I could free myself of all worldly possessions I felt at one with the universe 
And I could fly as high as the mountains I want to be a free bird again 
I want to be riding wave on the wind like a falcon across the meadows 
If it’s the last thing I do on this planet I’m going to free myself 
Of all that weighs me down and take some advice from an elder 
And go out ridding waves And go out ridding waves on the wind 
with a falcon again and again 
And go out ridding waves on the wind with a falcon again and again 
Like and Indian riding the waves of the wind I could free myself 
And go out ridding waves on the wind with a falcon again and again 
And go out ridding waves on the wind with a falcon again and again 
Like and Indian riding the waves of the wind I could free myself 
I could free myselfWhen I was young tall and strong I was a free bird 
When I was young tall and strong I was a free bird 
Like a Indian riding the waves of the wind 
I could free myself of all worldly possessions I felt at one with the universe 
And I could fly as high as the mountains I want to be a free bird again 
I want to be riding wave on the wind like a falcon across the meadows 
If it’s the last thing I do on this planet I’m going to free myself 
Of all that weighs me down and take some advice from an elder 

And go out ridding waves

Tuesday, February 1, 2011

"I'm a Eagle Soaring" Kevin Lajiness


video


Deep down inside I want to come to full consciousness
I’m an eagle soaring out of sight take me higher and higher
And higher I want to know the truth if searching is to find
I look under every rock I can and to clear my mind
So that thoughts might flow without apprehension
I’m an Eagle soaring out of sight take me higher and higher
And higher I welcome divine inspiration
I get excited with the notion of a new idea
That was molded from the hand print s of god
I’m an eagle soaring out of sight take me higher and higher
And higher Rain down on me rain down on me
 Touch me to my very soul take me higher and higher
 And higher I’m a eagle souring out of sight
 I’m a eagle souring out of sight take me higher and higher
 And higher Let me reach deep down inside
 I want to come to full consciousness I want to know the truth
 If searching is to find I look under every rock I can
 And to clear my mind so that thoughts might flow without
 Apprehension I’m an Eagle soaring out of sight take me higher
 And higher and higher I welcome divine inspiration I
 Get excited with the notion of a new idea that was molded
 From the hand prints of God I’m an eagle soaring out of sight
 Take me higher and higher and higher Rain down on me
 Rain down on me touch me to my very soul
 Take me higher and higher and higher I’m a eagle souring
 Out of sight take me higher and higher and higher
 I’m an eagle souring out of sight take me higher
 And higher and higher and higher

Thursday, January 13, 2011

Click to play Kevin Lajiness "Beckoning Call" Christmas CD

Click to play Kevin Lajiness "Beckoning Call" Christmas CD:
Kevin Lajiness "Beckoning Call" Christmas CD   

 Beckoning Call - Kevin Lajiness
 Can I Get A Witness - Kevin Lajiness
 Owwowwoww - Kevin Lajiness
 I Walked The Walk In Front Of Me - Kevin Lajiness
 I'm Standing In Front of You - Kevin Lajiness
 Hey hey - Kevin Lajiness
 Oh Jesus The Man's Man - Kevin Lajiness
 Oh Whats Wrong With Me - Kevin Lajiness
 The Changes Of Time - Kevin Lajiness
 I Kiss The Earth - Kevin Lajiness
 Blow Me Down - Kevin Lajiness
 I Can See Right Through You - Kevin Lajiness
 The Power - Kevin Lajiness
 What's it Gona Take - Kevin Lajiness

Saturday, November 6, 2010

Miracle Water

Play A Jango

a uw a uw I ah I I uw I ah I I uw I ah a a a a a a uw a uw I ah I I uw I ah I I uw I ah a a a a a
Terrapin turtles and dragon flies a world of wonder what’s became of us and still the children cry politicians blunder environmental disasters its no wonder were still alive it will take a miracle for us to survive I I uw I ah I I uw I ah a a a a a a uw a uw I ah I I uw I ah I I uw I ah a a a a a If I could move mountains and part the water I would do IT for the world to be at peace and survive another day as I search for perfection in an imperfect world the days run together loosing track of what ever If I ever get there it will be a miracle this time miracle waters flood the bay wash all mankind’s sins away so we may survive another day I I uw I ah I I uw I ah a a a a a a uw a uw I ah I I uw I ah I I uw I ah a a a a a Terrapin turtles and dragon flies a world of wonder what’s became of us and still the children cry politicians blunder environmental disasters its no wonder were still alive it will take a miracle for us to survive If I could move mountains and part the water I would do IT for the world to be at peace and survive another day I I uw I ah I I uw I ah a a a a a a uw a uw I ah I I uw I ah I I uw I ah a a a a aas I search for perfection in an imperfect world the days run together loosing track of what ever If I ever get there it will be a miracle this time miracle waters flood the bay wash all mankind’s sins away so we may survive another day time miracle waters flood the bay wash all mankind’s sins away so we may survive another day

Indian Hawk Prophacy



[00:07.20]I take my authority from the natural order of things
[00:15.37] Indian prophecy what is right for this time
[00:21.38] What is right for his land
[00:25.78]There is a time and a beginning and an end
[00:31.50] The natural order for all living things
[00:37.67] Even the earth the mountain and the sea are alive
[00:43.61]At one with humanity it is sacred it is divine
[00:55.72]Left to live and to die this is the way the cycle of life to say
[01:07.47]One god whatever he be to some a higher power
[01:15.44]In time all things are purified made clean
[01:23.70] This is the way one god whatever he be
[01:31.39]All things are part of the spirit and the spirit lives on
[01:38.98]And we live in that spirituality
[01:47.23]I take my authority from the natural order of things
[01:55.76] Indian prophecy what is right for this time
[02:01.55]What is right for his land there is a time and a beginning
[02:10.07] And an end the natural order for all living things
[02:17.75] Even the earth the mountain and the sea are alive
[02:24.91]At one with humanity it is sacred it is divine
[02:36.10] Left to live and to die this is the way the cycle of life to say
[02:47.57]One god whatever he be to some a higher power
[02:59.36] In time all things are purified made clean
[03:06.30] This is the way one god whatever he be
[03:13.95]All things are part of the spirit and the spirit lives on
[03:22.17]And we live in that spirituality
[03:30.04]I take my authority from the natural order of things

Friday, November 5, 2010

"I Want To Follow You" By Kevin Lajiness




I want to follow you I want to follow you
 In the misty air I see a hallow there
Is that the Sun trying to shine through
I want to follow you I don’t know where I belong
 But I am drawn to you I reach my arm out to you,
 I want to be your friend. I think I know what your about and I agree
 You are wiser than me someone has taught you the ways of life
 All that I know has come to me by reason and rhyme
 The patterns of nature if you will I find myself at your side
 I wish there was something I can give you but all that I have is part of me but I can promise I am true sometime I feel like I caught
Between a rock and a hard place I’m in two different places at the same time
But for now I will stay where I am but I am listening to you I hear you Calling out and if you want me to cry out for you I will put it in a song

Friday, August 6, 2010

Ibis in the Sunset take flight


Posted by Picasa

Wednesday, August 4, 2010

Tuesday, August 3, 2010

"Echo Maker" Kevin Lajiness



We are the great river children of them that forged a bond
And we are the bond for our future
Our fathers like crane and echo maker
Brought peace and prosperity trade throughout the territory
With their alliance our fathers new honor and wisdom
And humbled themselves to bring order through the great creator
You can here the rhythm of the men threw the songs that they
Sing as they carry their furs down the river
It was haunty but inviting and the bond brought forth a new nation
That spread across a continent but all that brings war
Nearly destroyed the new nation and the conflict changed it forever
But it survived even today it thrives but lacks spirituality
And its identity and I pray for it now to rise up again and bring the bonds that were made once back together so that we can be a family once more amen We are the great river children of them that forged a bond
And we are the bond for our future
Our fathers like crane and echo maker
Brought peace and prosperity trade throughout the territory
With their alliance our fathers new honor and wisdom
And humbled themselves to bring order through the great creator
You can here the rhythm of the men threw the songs that they
Sing as they carry their furs down the river
It was haunty but inviting and the bond brought forth a new nation
That spread across a continent but all that brings war
Nearly destroyed the new nation and the conflict changed it forever
But it survived even today it thrives but lacks spirituality
And its identity and I pray for it now to rise up again and bring the bonds that were made once back together so that we can be a family once more amen

"Indian Woman" Kevin Lajiness




I didn’t know I was looking for you Till you found me I want to know everything about you your fascinating to me I know what you say is true your and Indian woman your simply the best you rise above all the rest I say to you don’t change who you are Its just not me who sees you as a star I know your proud of your culture and where you came from It says something about you that you keep the light shining inside and you pass it on to the next generation Indian woman with shoulders that are broad you carry the weight of a nation I wish you the best I didn’t know I was looking for you Till you found me I want to know everything about you your fascinating to me I know what you say is true your and Indian woman your simply the best you rise above all the rest I say to you don’t change who you are Its just not me who sees you as a star I know your proud of your culture and where you came from It says something about you that you keep the light shining inside and you pass it on to the next generation Indian woman with shoulders that are broad you carry the weight of a nation I wish you the best

"Joined as One Forever" Kevin Lajiness

I woke up in a sweat last night
I had a vision it was a terrible sight
 I took a journey and they showed me of there plight
 I saw two hands joined together by the great creator
 It spanned an ocean and a continent
Then there was a great fight that
Crossed the ocean and a continent
Two kingdoms come from it
 But one was left in the dust and ashes
Too rise from the two that were left for it was born
 Of love not war no man should forget the children
Of those that cried there fathers that died
 That they were joined as one but live in two kingdoms
 Give thanks to the one he has blessed the children
I woke up in a sweat last night I had a vision it was a terrible sight
I took a journey and they showed me of there plight
 I saw two hands joined together by the great creator
 It spanned an ocean and a continent then there was a great fight
 That crossed the ocean and a continent
Two kingdoms come from it but one was left in the dust and ashes
 To rise from the two that were left for it was born of love not war
 No man should forget the children of those that cried
 There fathers that died that they were joined as one
 But live in two kingdoms give thanks to the one
 He has blessed the children

Monday, August 2, 2010

"I Dont Give A Dam Anymore" Kevin Lajiness



It’s my life you been playing with and you never gave a damn about what I did
If you did you wouldn’t be trying to pull the rug out on me
It’s my life you been playing with and you never gave a damn about what I did if you did you wouldn’t be trying to pull the rug out on me but I’m not playing that games and I never did I’m a man who does what I say and I know what I did, I don’t need your approval I don’t even need your support but you said it once that should have been enough for me I don’t think anyone cares
Well I’m not just anyone to me and I did give a damn but you’ll never know what could have been cause I’m caving in so it’s true what you say now I don’t think anyone cares now cause I’m done caring for you now I don’t give a damn
It’s my life you been playing with and you never gave a damn about what I did if you did you wouldn’t be trying to pull the rug out on me but I’m not playing that games and I never did I’m a man who does what I say and I know what I did, I don’t need your approval I don’t even need your support but you said it once that should have been enough for me I don’t think anyone cares
Well I’m not just anyone to me and I did give a damn but you’ll never know what could have been cause I’m caving in so it’s true what you say now I don’t think anyone cares now cause I’m done caring for you now I don’t give a damn
It’s my life you been playing with and you never gave a damn about what I did if you did you wouldn’t be trying to pull the rug out on me but I’m not playing that games and I never did I’m a man who does what I say and I know what I did, I don’t need your approval I don’t even need your support but you said it once that should have been enough for me I don’t think anyone cares
Well I’m not just anyone to me and I did give a damn but you’ll never know what could have been cause I’m caving in

"Turn Back The Hands Of Time" Kevin Lajiness

Play At Jango
Everything that’s been said has been said before
Everything that’s been said has been said before
Everything that’s been said has been said before
Problem with white man He talks out both sides of his mouth
And he throws common sense out the door
The Indian way had evolved the laws of Life and the ways of Nature
Their teaching every phrase of thought and action from the sacredness of self
To the duty of each man toward his brother they warned us our ways of life
Leads to the destruction of our mother, turn back the hands of time
And follow you brother, turn back the hands of time and follow your brother
Turn back the hands of time and follow your brother It’s not to late to save our mother
Everything that’s been said has been said before
Everything that’s been said has been said before
Everything that’s been said has been said before
Problem with white man He talks out both sides of his mouth
And he throws common sense out the door
The Indian way had evolved the laws of Life and the ways of Nature
Their teaching every phrase of thought and action from the sacredness of self
To the duty of each man toward his brother they warned us our ways of life
Leads to the destruction of our mother, turn back the hands of time
And follow you brother, turn back the hands of time and follow your brother
Turn back the hands of time and follow your brother It’s not to late to save our mother

Monday, July 19, 2010

Location of the Ancient Wyandot (Huron) and Maumee River valley Indians

http://americanindianshistory.blogspot.com/ "The Wyandots, Miamis, Shawnees, Delawares, Ottawas, Chippewas and Potawatomi. These were the seven tribes known in after years as the "western confederacy," who fought so long and bitterly against the government of the United States, and who were at last conquered by the arms and genius of General Anthony Wayne in the year 1794.
The Ottawas, Chippewas and Potawatomi formed a sort of loose confederacy known as the Three Fires, and Massas, a Chippewa chief, so referred to them at the Treaty of Greenville.
The Miamis, the most powerful of the confederates, were subdivided into the Eel Rivers, the Weas, and the Piankeshaws. The Kickapoos, a small tribe which lived on the Sangamon, and the Vermilion of the Wabash, were associated generally with the Potawatomi, and were always the allies of the English. The Winnebagoes of Wisconsin were of the linguistic family of the Sioux; were [Pg 45]generally associated with the confederates against the Americans, and many of their distinguished warriors fought against General Harrison at Tippecanoe. The decadent tribes known in early times as the Illinois, did not play a conspicuous part in the history of the northwest.A description of the seven tribes of savages who opposed the advance of settlement in the Northwest. Their location. Kekionga, the seat of Miami power.
Miami Indian Picture Gallery"  Under Construction

24 - HISTORY OF HENRY AND FULTON COUNTIES.

When the impartial historian reviews the beauties and attractions of this country, the ease with
which the Indian could subsist, the sport of hunting and fishing, of paddling his frail bark canoe
across lakes and on the streams, running the rapids of the swift rivers upon whose banks their
villages were usually situated, where their children, in the limpid waters, sported like dolphins in
the long summer days, and the hunter slaked his thirst at the bubbling spring of pure, cold water
that could be found bursting from the banks, and the thousand attractions natural to the civilized
or savage man, who would not contend for such a country ? Would not civilized and cultured
man ? Surely the North American Indian might be pardoned, if not exonerated for fighting for his
home, his council fires and the graves of his fathers, that had not been already desecrated by the
foot of the stranger.

Saturday, July 17, 2010

Tuesday, April 13, 2010

Tuesday, March 16, 2010

Sunday, March 7, 2010

William Penn: America’s First Great Champion for Liberty and Peace | The Freeman | Ideas On Liberty

"The only Reason I Bring up William Penn is to show as in Early Detroit Natives Friendship and Marriage was sought to Strengthen ties for Fur trade Dynastic Families, Penn's Experiment was the result of Religious Reformation and freedom. The Quakers believed it brotherly love, and to prove this Philadelphia was not fortified against the Indians and friendship was encouraged by him, obviously this did not last"-KL
William Penn: America’s First Great Champion for Liberty and Peace | The Freeman | Ideas On Liberty: "In October 1712, Penn suffered a stroke while writing a letter about the future of Pennsylvania. Four months later, he suffered a second stroke.

While he had difficulty speaking and writing, he spent time catching up with his children whom he had missed during his missionary travels. He died on July 30, 1718. He was buried at Jordans, next to Guli.

Long before his death, Pennsylvania ceased to be a spiritual place dominated by Quakers. Penn’s policy of religious toleration and peace—no military conscription—attracted all kinds of war-weary European immigrants. There were English, Irish, and Germans, Catholics, Jews, and an assortment of Protestant sects including Dunkers, Huguenots, Lutherans, Mennonites, Moravians, Pietists, and Schwenkfelders. Liberty brought so many immigrants that by the American Revolution Pennsylvania had grown to some 300,000 people and became one of the largest colonies. Pennsylvania was America’s first great melting pot.

Philadelphia was America’s largest city with almost 18,000 people. It was a major commercial center—sometimes more than a hundred trading ships anchored there during a single day. People in Philadelphia could enjoy any of the goods available in England. Merchant companies, shipyards, and banks flourished. Philadelphia thrived as an entrepot between Europe and the American frontier.

With an atmosphere of liberty, Philadelphia emerged as an intellectual center. Between 1740 and 1776, Philadelphia presses issued an estimated 11,000 works including pamphlets, almanacs, and books. In 1776, there were seven newspapers reflecting a wide range of opinions. No wonder Penn’s “city of brotherly love” became the most sacred site for American liberty, where Thomas Jefferson wrote the Declaration of Independence, and delegates drafted the Constitution."

"Once Penn received his charter he realized--or at least was informed--that much of the land he wanted was held by Indians who would expect payment
http://xroads.virginia.edu/~cap/penn/hicks1.gif
 in exchange for a quitclaim to vacate the territory. The tribe he would have to deal with most often was the Delaware (Leni Lenape), who had never been defeated militarily by the Swedes or the Dutch. Penn, not surprisingly, had no military ambitions; he even refused to fortify Philadelphia. As such, the only practical and legal way to get their land and secure their friendship was the treaty
(201) We do know that Penn did buy much land, so must have made at least one such agreement, instituting what was known in Indian terminology as a 'chain of friendship'. And there do exist several references to this chain being made between Penn and the Delaware."


Monday, August 17, 2009

Tuesday, May 19, 2009

SansCrainte Timeline

1723 Jean Baptiste Romain Dit Sanscrainte b: May 16, in Montreal, Canada
1754 Married: 25 FEB in Montréal, QC Suzanne-Amable DENIAU

1754 Jean Baptiste Romain dit Sanscrainte b. probably Laprairie

1760,January 7, JEAN ROMAIN DIT SANSCRAINTE witnesses the mutual consent ofthe nuptial benediction to michel Boier and to josette marguerite de lignon at michilimakinak

1760 October 9 Jacque(one source says female) Sans Crainte born to Jean Baptiste Sans Crainte and Indian slave michilimakinak


1761 jean romain dit Sanscrainte witnesses, the mutual consent of pierre duprés and of marie joseph carignan at michilimakinak July 18,

1765 Jean Baptiste Sanscrainte (John Soncrant) came from Quebec ( this would have been the father the son would have only been 11 years old and the date may be right for when he set up the post but he was in Michilimackinac as early as 1760 and up to 1795 as noted by Greenville treaty notes –Kevin Lajiness) and settled on the north bank of the Huron river(Detroit Area) at present day West Jefferson. He sold this property to Gabriel Godfroy in 1796- Rockwood, The Huron River, Patricia Quick, Rockwood Area Historical Society

1778 Margaret Solo m.Jean Baptiste7 Romain dit Sanscrainte, bap 24 Dec 1754 Montréal PQ; ma 13 Oct Detroit MI

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

[1785 (should be 1778) John B. Sancraint (SansCrainte). Marriage To Margaret Soleau (Solo) Died 1838

The Corect date for the marriage is 1778 as listed above and with Tanquay

  

"From The History of Monroe County, Michigan: A Narrative Account of Its ..., Volume 1

 By John McClelland "





"He was an interpreter as was his father as far as assisting in the removal it was probably in that capacity he was certainly on the side of the Indians his wife was raised by "Marie Mannon" suppose daughter of Pontiac's he also faught with Pontiacs son and was captured at "the fall of Sackville, any way there is much more conflicting with this history that i cant find elswhere -KL"   
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1779 Serjeant
Sanscrainte, whose father (who had come with Clarke from the Ilinois) at that instant stepping up raised the muzzle and obtained his son's life by applying to Colol. Clarke

1779 Jean Baptiste Romain dit Sanscrainte was deeded land on Rivire-au-Loutre (Otter Creek) in by the Potawatomies

1786,15, May Deed from Potawatomie for land on the River Raisin; signed by 5 Indians with totems; witnessed by J. B. Sanscrainte and Francois Navarre. From Labadie Family Papers. (This is attributed to both Jean Baptiste Sanscrainte 1749-1822(I question these dates) and Jean Baptiste Romain dit Sanscrainte b.1754)
1790 Explorer Hugh Heward’s journal describes a
trading post, operated by Jean Baptiste Sanscriante, in near the Potawatomi settlement

Moravian indians
1795 (Nov 9 1810 –fifteen years ago) the late surveyor, McNiff came up the Huron with Sanscrainte the interpreter to survey land by order of John Askins

1795-No prisoners remain in our hands in the neighborhood of Michilimackinac. Those two Frenchmen present (Messieurs Sans Crainte and Pepin,) can witness to the truth of this assertion " (Indian to general Wayne)

Monday, May 18, 2009

In 2020 Ypsilanti

VISION FOR 2020
In 2020 Ypsilanti enjoys its rich cultural and architectural heritage, the end-result of centuries of historic migrations to this ancient river
crossing. Native American, European American and African American groups settled here, each with a distinct and venerable history.
Paleo-Indian ancestors of Native American tribes lived in Michigan as early as 1200 B.C.1, 2 In 1772, an English officer’s report
describes a small Native American Bodewadimi (“Potawatomi”) settlement on the banks of the Huron River, situated near the
intersection of the Potawatomi and Sauk Indian trails, location of present-day Ypsilanti.3 Explorer Hugh Heward’s journal describes a
trading post, operated by Jean Baptiste Sanscriante, in 1790 near the Potawatomi settlement (today the Riverside Arts Center Annex).3
View Larger Map
Gabriel Godfroy subsequently acquired the trading post from Sanscriante, and submitted a French Claim in 1808 to protect his rights to
the trading post and property.3 European Americans established a settlement here in 1823 and Ypsilanti’s first African American
settlers joined the community in 1837 and 1838.

Saturday, May 16, 2009

RootsWeb's WorldConnect Project: Lyons: "# ID: I0313





  • ID: I0311





  • Name: Claude SOLO 1





  • Sex: M





  • Birth: 21 SEP 1732 in Montreal, Quebec





  • Death: ABT. 29 JAN 1799 in St. Antoine, River Raisin, Michigan





  • Event: Burial Date 29 JAN 1799 St. Antoine, River Raisin





  • Religion: Catholic





  • Note: Claude Solo became involved or married a Sauteuse Indian woman after the death of Margaret Descomps dit Labadie. The Sauteuse Indian woman gave birth in 1770 to Claude's third son, John Baptiste as a result of their relationship.



    Father: Peter Henry SOLO
    Mother: Ann Teresa GAMELIN b: 2 FEB 1707 in St. Francis du Lac

    Marriage 1 Sauteuse INDIAN Children

    1. Has No Children John Baptist SOLO b: 1770

    Marriage 2 Margaret Descomps "dit" LABADIE b: 22 AUG 1734 in Montreal, Quebec

    • Married: 22 JAN 1759 in Detroit, Michigan
    Children

    1. Has Children Peter SOLO b: 15 NOV 1759 in Detroit, Michigan
    2. Has No Children Margaret SOLO b: 3 MAY 1761
    3. Has No Children Alexis SOLO b: 6 FEB 1763
    4. Has No Children Margaret SOLO b: 22 JUL 1764

    Sources:

    1. Title: Genealogy of the French Families of the Detroit River Region 1701 - 1936
      Author: Rev. Fr. Christian Denissen
      Publication: Published by Detroit Society for Genealogical Research
      Note: Detroit Public Library is locates on Woodward Ave. in Detroit, Michigan 48202
      Note: Very Good
      Repository:
      Note: Library of Congress & Burton Historical Collection, Detroit Public Library
      Media: Book
      Page: Page 1145








  • # Name: Margaret SOLO 1
    # Sex: F
    # Birth: 3 MAY 1761
    # Religion: Catholic
    # Note: Margaret was born May 3, 1761 at the Coast of the Potowatomies South West Coast of Detroit
    ___________________________________________________________________

    Margaret Solo m.Jean Baptiste7 Romain dit Sanscrainte, bap 24 Dec 1754 Montréal PQ; ma 13 Oct 1778 Detroit MI,

    Father: Claude SOLO b: 21 SEP 1732 in Montreal, Quebec
    Mother: Margaret Descomps 'dit' LABADIE b: 22 AUG 1734 in Montreal, Quebec


    Sources:


    1. Title: Genealogy of the French Families of the Detroit River Region 1701 - 1936
    Author: Rev. Fr. Christian Denissen
    Publication: Published by Detroit Society for Genealogical Research
    Note: Detroit Public Library is locates on Woodward Ave. in Detroit, Michigan 48202
    Note: Very Good
    Repository:
    Note: Library of Congress & Burton Historical Collection, Detroit Public Library
    Media: Book
    Page: Page 1145"


    (Margaret's Mother Died When she was 4 years old, she would of been Razed by the second wife
    a Sauteuse Indian. Maybe this would be a partial explanation to her husband John Bapte. SansCrainte and son of the same name intimate ties with the Indians besides being born
    at the Coast of the Potowatomies and having a brother that was half blood-(Kevin Lajiness)
    ____________________________________________________________________
    BURTON HISTORICAL RECORDS

    SECTION VI
    HUGH HEWARD'S JOURNAL FROM DETROIT
    TO THE ILLINOIS: 1790

    Thursday Ap1 1st 1790. Early in the Morning came to red
    Cedar under the high Banks & continued with a Strong
    Current the Water by the Banks to nearly Mid Day when
    we met with several Small pine Trees the Banks still high
    & barren abounding with diminutive Red Oak Trees & the
    Soil with Fern, about 4 oClock passed an Indian Cabbin
    & Cornfield & arrd at Sans Craints5 before Sun Set. Distance
    & Course nearly as yesterday. Encamped.
    Friday April 2d 1790. Could not get an Indian to pass
    the Portage but engaged one to meet us at the Fork of the
    River to conduct us this Post seems to furnish good small
    peltrie Sanscrannt seems to have about 12 packs. Set off
    about 10 oClock our Course up the River nearly West

    Notes:
    5 On the Sanscrainte line see ante, 324. Apparently the individual here noted
    was Jean Baptiste Romain dit Sanscrainte who was born in 1754 and married at
    Detroit, Oct. 13, 1778, Margaret Solo. She was buried here on March 19, 1793.
    They had several children born at Detroit, most of whom subsequently became
    residents of River Raisin settlement. Sanscrainte was bitterly accused by the
    British authorities of pro-American activities prior and subsequent to Wayne's
    campaign of 1794. See Denissen, op. cit., and Mich. Pio. Colls., XII, 162 ff.
    341

    Friday, May 15, 2009


    CADILLAC'S VILLAGE OR "DETROIT UNDER CADILLAC." WITH LIST OF PROPERTY OWNERS AND A HISTORY OF THE SETTLEMENT 1701 TO 1710. COMPILED BY C. M. BURTON DETROIT, 1896.




    CADILLAC'S HOMESTEAD. Where did Cadillac live?
    I cannot answer this question satisfactorily now, though I think he lived on the northwest corner of St. Francois and Ste. Anne streets, near the church. If I am right his house was on what is now the north side of Jefferson avenue, half way between Griswold and Shelby streets, about where the old Masonic hall stands. You will observe that the properties bringing the highest prices were those on Ste. Anne street, in the immediate vicinity of this land. This would naturally follow, if the house of the cornmandant was located here, St. Anne Street, at this point, was the Woodward avenue of the little city, and here the aristocracy lived with Cadillac in their midst.
    What kind of houses did they have?
    From all I have so far learned, the modern idea of a log house was unknown to them. I think their houses, even those of the better classes, consisted of stakes, driven into the ground as closely together as possible and the interstices filled with mortar or mud. These pickets were cut off, even, at the top, and a pitch-roof of split rails put on. Sawing lumber by hand was too difficult a job to permit much sawed lumber to be used, and what would be thus obtained was for interior work, doors, shutters, etc. It is very probable that no houses had windows, except those of the wealthiest citizens. Glass, for windows, was doubtless very scarce and very expensive. I can find no certain record that there was any glass windows at all, though in the description of the church occurs the statement that it contained a window with shutters and sash frames between, "of 20 squares," each. The squares may refer to the small panes of glass, common even until a few years since, in church windows. A short time after Cadillac left Detroit to become governor of Louisiana, in 1711, he had a complete inventory of his belongings in Detroit, made by Pierre Chesne and Antoine Magnant, and the priest, Father Cherubin Deniaux, and this property was turned over to Pierre Roy for safe keeping. From this list we obtain an idea of the buildings owned by Cadillac, and I append their full description.
    ____________________________________________________________________
    (Pierre Chesne and Pierre Roy were to be inlaws- Kevin Lajiness)
    _____________________________________________________________________
    Text not available
    The City of Detroit, Michigan, 1701-1922 By Clarence Monroe Burton, William Stocking, Gordon K. Miller

    Text not available
    The History of Detroit and Michigan By Silas Farmer

    "From the LANDMARKS OF DETROIT A HISTORY OF THE CITY

     By ROBERT B ROSS AND GEORGE B. CATLIN"

     Ouabankikow Marguerite an Indian of the Miami tribe the wife of Pierre Roy 110
    There is no record of her marriage though the priest called her a legal wife She died of
    small pox October 31 1732 She had six children baptized in the church at Detroit



    Landmarks of Detroit; By Robert Budd Ross, George Byron Catlin, Clarence Monroe Burton

    Tuesday, May 12, 2009

    River Raisin Battlefield - Areas of Local Interest

    NAVARRE:
    Lt. Col. Francois Navarre was born in Detroit about 1763 and came to the River Raisin in the 1780’s, where he received lands from the Potawatomies and Ottawas. Generally considered the founder of the French Town settlement along the River Raisin, Navarre was instrumental in easing the transition from British to American rule in the 1790’s. With the departure of Colonel John Anderson in the summer of 1812, Navarre was left in nominal command of the local militia, who, by the terms of Hull’s capitulation, were disarmed and placed on parole as prisoners of war.

    During the brief liberation of French Town in January of 1813, Navarre acted as the liaison between the local population and the American army. General Winchester established his headquarters at Navarre’s house, although it was almost a mile away from his main camp. After the war, Navarre continued to be a prominent civic leader until his death in 1826.

    About 30 members of the extended Navarre family served in the War of 1812. Most famous as a scout for the American army was Peter Navarre, who resided along the River Raisin, but moved to the Maumee with his family about 1807.

    Peter Navarre helped guide the detachment under Lt. Col. Lewis to French Town on January 18, 1813, and participated in the battle to liberate the town from an occupation force of British militia and Indians. He and his brothers also fought in the Battle of the River Raisin on January 22, escaping through the surrounding Indians just as the Kentuckians were surrendering. He spent the rest of the war as a courier and scout for General Harrison. Considered the founder of Toledo (or at least East Toledo), he died in 1874.



    Text not available

    Text not available

    Text not available
    History of Monroe County, Michigan A Narrative Account of Its Historical Progress, Its People, and Its Principal Interests By John McClelland Buckley

    Village of Tippecanoe, Wabash River, 4:00AM, Nov. 7, 1811 Navarre and Sanscrainte Fur traders

    FRENCHTOWN DIARIES: WAR OF 1812 IN MICHIGAN

    Friends of the River Raisin Battlefield | www.riverraisinbattlefield.org

    The Prophet’s Town was a small, but handsome village
    of a couple hundred cabannes. It was equipped with a
    large, central storehouse containing about 3,000 bushels
    of corn and beans. One could have mistaken it for a
    comfortable, sleepy haven of peace, were it not for the
    furtive activity taking place throughout the night. i
    Peter Navarre stirred groggily under his blanket. He
    had been awakened by noises coming from outside his
    shelter. The noises were made by native warriors pecking
    sharp edges onto their gunflints.
    As he began to throw off his covering, the low voice of
    Jean-Baptiste Sanscrainte came to him out of the
    darkness: “Be still,” Baptiste whispered, “if you value
    your life.”
    Navarre did as he was told, wondering just what was
    going on. Hours seemed to pass as he waited and
    reflected on the events which had brought them to this
    hotbed of Native-American resistance.
    It had all started when Sanscrainte invited him to join
    his fur trading venture to the Prairie Potawatomies near
    Chicago. After visiting several villages, they had acquired
    only a small quantity of furs. When he complained about
    their lack of success, Sanscrainte had assured him they do
    better on their return trip to the Maumee. This is what
    had brought them, after more than a month of travel, to
    the Prophet’s town. Unfortunately, they arrived just as
    General Harrison appeared with an American army.
    So instead of trading, the village chiefs had spent most
    of the previous day negotiating with General Harrison.
    Tecumseh being absent at the time, leadership fell to the
    Prophet. The Miami chief White Moon (White
    Loon), and the Potawatomi chiefs Stone Eater, and
    Winemac were all more in a mood to fight rather than
    trade. Navarre and Sanscrainte, discouraged, had
    retired early. ii
    Village of Tippecanoe, Wabash River, 4:00AM, Nov. 7, 1811:
    ! It was an hour or more before dawn, when the noise of battle
    came in through the stillness of the night. At first, Navarre and
    Sanscrainte had strained to hear beneath the patter of a drizzling rain,
    but gradually the sound of gunfire rose in volume as the battle peaked
    at a point about 3 miles away from them.
    ! The two traders decided it would be best if the American soldiers
    did not find them in the Indian village after the fighting, or they might
    mistake them for renegades or British collaborators. So they quietly
    packed up their belongings and left for home. iii
    ! The American army was not caught completely unawares.
    General Harrison had ordered his men to sleep on their arms, and had
    himself come out of his tent just minutes before the attack began. The
    orderly musician was standing by, ready to give three taps of the
    drum, the usual signal for the troops to get up and stand by their
    arms. Ten minutes more, and the troops would be standing in line of
    battle.
    ! Some of the soldiers were already up and throwing fresh wood on
    the morning fires. Silhouetted against the flames, they made easy
    targets. Realizing their exposure, the men made frantic efforts to
    douse the fires, but to no avail. Those who tried were quickly picked
    off by Indian sharpshooters.
    " Although inexperienced, the troops responded to their officers’
    commands to form and hold their lines, keeping up a heavy fire into the
    dark shadows. Their muskets, loaded with buck and ball, were well
    designed for this type of indiscriminate firing.iv As daylight broke over
    the tree line, Indian pressure slackened. The 4th Regiment and a
    detachment of dragoons mounted a charge. Giving 3 cheers, they
    drove the Indians off into the adjoining swamps.
    " 38 warriors were left dead in the field, and the troops found a few
    more bodies when they advanced to search and destroy the Prophet’s
    abandoned village. Harrison’s men lost 41 killed and 147 wounded, and
    their line had been forced three times, but they had finally won the day
    and delivered a heavy blow to the prestige of the Prophet. v
    ! In their search, the soldiers found a severely wounded Potawatomi
    chief. Taken before Governor Harrison, the chief expressed regrets
    for the attack and blamed the Prophet for misleading them.
    " Harrison had the surgeon dress the Potawatomi’s wounds and left
    him on the field of battle. He was given a message to deliver to the rest
    of the Indians, urging them to abandon the Prophet and to agree to
    the governor’s terms for peace.

    Kevin's Mixes

    : Audio Mixed with Mixcraft 4.2 Build 104 by Acoustica P.O. Box 728 Oakhurst, CA 93644 U.S.A

    About Me

    My Photo

    This is Long over due for an Edit, but the main thing is I've been progressing with my music

    my latest album "In The Minds Of Prophets"In The Minds Of Prophets 3/17/2015 and Hopefully "Dark Cloud" 4/1/2015. "Once Upon a Perfect Storm" 2014 . Out 3/10/14 "The King of the Fire" 

    "I'm going to rewrite this soon to include some life events" Here's the dealeo, I started doing Wood Sculptures about 15 years ago to try and keep myself busy after I stopped drinking and smoking. About 5 years into it I got throat and neck Cancer. I say this because before I had the Cancer I had not written or sung Music. Looking to clean up an open space in late 2007 and 2008 ( http://openspacedocumentary.blogspot.com/) i became closer to some of the local wild life, I bonded with a Hawk and a Baby duck and started to write songs, I forced myself to sing when I could, I have over three hundred songs now, some good, some not so good, but I am getting better at writing, singing, mixing and arranging.    

    New:"Charleena"2013 "The River" 2013 and "Cried and Cried My life Story"2012 others "Reflections Destiny"2012 "Kevin'ns Epic Music"2012 "Fire Storm Of Emotion" 2012"Angel Secrets"2012 All 18 Available at my Store http://www.reverbnation.com/Kevin Lajiness

    Song Writer/Naive Artist/story-teller

              Nature inspires Linwood man to sing, record despite bout with throat cancer (PressOfAtlanticCity.Com)

     Album "Epic Shine"  "Walk Away" before that was"Angel Woman" along with some old remakes"Sing Back In time2011" and "Its The Spirit In The Dance" along with over one hundred of my songs and other Albums available for Sale all streaming at http://www.reverbnation.com/kevinlajiness 
      I write from a position of emotion and honesty, usually tell a story about love, life, relationships, nature, adventure, history, spirituality,philosophy etc. My Art and Music style is Naive, I beat mix looped instruments as accompaniments but the melodies don't necessarily match, but I put a great deal of thought into them and try and bring something epic to bear in mind, yet some of my songs are ballads and relaxing songs of love . 
       I have 5 song books/ songbooks online 4 of them avalable as google e-books my "The 2009" http://kevinlajiness2009song.blogspot.com/  and 2010 Song Book https://books.google.com/books?id=SWsPBAAAQBAJThe 2011 Song Book https://books.google.com/books?id=8xkOBAAAQBAJ  and 
    Kevin Lajiness 2012 Song Book https://books.google.com/books?id=MpsNBAAAQBAJKevin Lajiness 2013-2014 Song Book (Google eBook)http://books.google.com/books/about/Kevin_Lajiness_2013_2014_Song_Book.html?id=wHEMBAAAQBAJ
     These books represent a ton of work , good bad or indifferent. I apologize ahead of time for typo's English and spelling, i suck at all of that, but it's about the music and lyrics and that's what really matter but I gave it my best.
     with some links to the songs , some I have taken down, (I am going to try and put them all back up for nostalgia and to show my progress from Throat and neck Cancer), but the lyrics are all there
      I have many slideshows/Videos of nature and Open Space pic's over the years that I put to my music on YouTube-kevinlajiness  and saved in Google + or Picasa.

      I grew up on Lake Erie Lagoons, my grandfather had a bate shop. Fishing and hunting was big on my fathers side no doubted stemmed from the fact that his ancestors were “Woods Runners” or “coureurs des bois”. As long as I can remember I’ve had a love for trees, nature and the environment, I attribute that, and the spiritual connection I have with mother earth, to the connection my ancestors had with the Indigenous peoples of the Americas. Most if not all of them are child friendly. I started writing my early songs while working on a open space for a year, where I bonded with a hawk and a duck.

            Allot of what I draw from comes from life’s experience and what’s in my heart, what I believe is a responsibility to carry the messages of or ancestors on what is right, to come to a conclusion we are all part of something bigger than ourselves and that we pass that on to our children in story and song,but remember i am an artist I write story and rhyme, lesson and fable, I do not try to be politically correct.even though i don't use cuss words other that Hell and dam, I don't have a problem with artist that do,to each there own, I believe things evolve for a reason, hey it got someone out of the slums, by the way the baby duck that followed me home got to big and i gave her to a zoo keeper, she flew back to his house from the zoo and they raised her, she has since had her own baby's